Install UNIFI Ubuntu

New Member
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎05-31-2017
Kudos: 3

Install Unifi on Ubuntu Desktop 18.04 LTS – Complete

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I was looking for complete instructions on the process of installing and running Unifi in it’s current state, version 5.6.37 on Ubuntu. With the newest LTS just rolling out it seemed opportune to figure it all out.  I will warn you now that I am not a linux user, but I think you’ll find this approach pretty easy to follow and effective.  This is bare bones instructions, hope they work for you!
Start with a fresh install of Ubuntu Desktop 18.04LTS
  1. Go to the ubnt.com download page and click to download the debian/ubuntu package.
  2. Open it using the default applications installer.
  3. Open terminal and enter:
    sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-installer
    cd /usr/bin
    sudo mv mongod mongod.bin
    sudo gedit mongod
  4. Enter the following into the text editor*:
    #!/bin/bash
    cleaned_args=$(echo $* | sed -e 's/--nohttpinterface//')
    exec /usr/bin/mongod.bin ${cleaned_args}
  5. Go to chrome.com and download and install chrome, the same way you installed Unifi in step 2.
  6. I rebooted, you may not need to, but now open chrome and go to https://localhost:8443
That should be it, this is the most efficient way I could figure to get everything happy. I’ll read this again when I’m awake to make sure I didn’t skip anything I did. Maybe duplicate the process on a virtual machine and get screenshots. In the meanwhile, I hope this helps someone, because I had a heck of a time putting all the pieces together. I don’t have cloud connect working, but I remember running across that in my journey. So I’ll update and get that into here tomorrow.
*This part may not be necessary, I was a bit tired and forgot to try opening the website with Chrome. Which is the only browser that plays nice with Unifi. So if someone tries it before I get back to this, let me know! Luckily, it only takes a moment.

New Member
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎02-11-2018

Re: Install Unifi on Ubuntu Desktop 18.04 LTS – Complete

[ New ]

It worked without reboot.

But I did a :

sudo service unifi restart

I also just followed this guide and did the installation through SSH instead of manual download:

https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/articles/220066768-UniFi-How-to-Install-Update-via-APT-on-Debian-or-U…

Change ip addres ubuntu

Configure Node Networking

 

Configure Networking on Ubuntu

During the installation of Ubuntu on your server an IP address was most likely obtained automatically. This dynamic IP address assignment will need to be changed to a static IP address. This section will cover the simple network configuration changes needed to set a static IP network address for your server. For this section, the directions assume the configuration is for a node with only one interface (eth0) after a default installation.

Note

These instructions assume that the reader is familiar with opening, editing and saving files at the command line. Please consult your OS documentation if you need assistance with these tasks.

Most Linux systems have a few commands that can be used to find out what the current network configuration is, for example:

ifconfig -a

You can also use variations of the ip command:

ip addr

Basic network configuration and hostname on a Ubuntu system are stored in several files which must be edited to create a working configuration:

  • /etc/network/interfaces describes the network interfaces
  • /etc/hostname configures the nameserver credentials
  • /etc/hosts resolves IP addresses to hostnames

Once the new configuration is saved the interface must be restarted.

Changing Network Configuration

Below is an example of a static IP configuration on a system with only one Ethernet interface (eth0) and 10.0.0.41/24 for the IP address. Opening the /etc/network/interfaces file will produce:

# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
    address 10.0.0.41
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    network 10.0.0.0
    broadcast 10.0.0.255
    gateway 10.0.0.1
    dns-nameservers 10.0.0.1 8.8.8.8
    dns-domain acme.com
    dns-search acme.com
Open your /etc/network/interfaces file, locate the:
  • “iface eth0…” line and change dynamic to static
  • address line and change the address to the static IP address
  • netmask line and change the address to the correct subnet mask
  • gateway line and change the address to the correct gateway address
  • dns-nameservers line and change (or add) the nameserver information

If you aren’t certain which IP address, subnet mask, gateway or dns-nameservers you need, please consult with your network administrator for the correct information.

When you are happy with your configuration restart the interface with the command below. If you are connected using SSH you will lose your connection, re-connect using the new IP address:

ifdown eth0; ifup eth0

Changing the Hostname

To change the hostname to your preferred node name (example: prodnode01), you have to edit the /etc/hostname file:

prodnode01

Adding the FQDN (Hostname)

To ensure your server traffic will be routing correctly add the server’s Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) and IP address to the hosts file. Open the /etc/hosts file and add a line with the static IP address and the FQDN, similar to the example shown below:

192.168.0.0 prodnode01.acme.com

With all your files edited and saved, you should reboot so the new name and configuration will be used.

Reboot the system and then use ifconfig or ipaddr to confirm that your new configuration is available. You can also use hostname -f to verify the hostname change,

 

Configure Networking on CentOS / Red Hat

During the installation of CentOS/Red Hat on your server an IP address was most likely obtained automatically. This dynamic IP address assignment will need to be changed to a static IP address. This section will cover the simple network configuration changes needed to set a static IP network address for your server. For this section, the directions assume the configuration is for a node with only one interface (eth0) after a default installation.

Note

These instructions assume that the reader is familiar with opening, editing and saving files at the command line. Please consult your OS documentation if you need assistance with these tasks.

Most Linux systems have a few commands that can be used to find out what the current network configuration is, for example:

ifconfig -a

You can also use variations of the ip command:

ip addr

Basic network configuration and hostname on a CentOS/Red Hat system are stored in several files which must be edited to create a working configuration:

  • /etc/sysconfig/network specifies routing and host information for all interfaces
  • /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-ethX contains the configuration scripts for each network interface
  • /etc/resolv.conf configures the nameserver credentials
  • /etc/hosts resolves IP addresses to hostnames

Changing Network Configuration

Name server configuration is in /etc/resolv.conf:

search acme.com
nameserver 10.0.0.1
nameserver 8.8.8.8
Open your /etc/resolv.conf file, locate the:
  • first nameserver line and change the nameserver information
  • second nameserver line and change (or add) the nameserver information

If you aren’t certain which nameservers you need, please consult with your network administrator for the correct information.

Below is an example of a static IP configuration on a system with only one Ethernet interface (eth0) and 10.0.0.41/24 for the IP address. Opening the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file will produce:

DEVICE="eth0"
BOOTPROTO="none"
ONBOOT="yes"
TYPE="Ethernet"
IPADDR=10.0.0.42
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
BROADCAST=10.0.0.255
GATEWAY=10.0.0.1
Open your /etc/network/interfaces file, locate the:
  • BOOTPROTO line and change dhcp to none.
  • IPADDR line and change the address to the static IP address
  • NETMASK line and change the address to the correct subnet mask
  • GATEWAY line and change the address to the correct gateway address

If you aren’t certain which IP address, subnet mask or gateway you need, please consult with your network administrator for the correct information.

Changing the Hostname

For a node called prodnode02.acme.com the content of the /etc/sysconfig/network file would look like this:

NETWORKING=yes
HOSTNAME=prodnode02.acme.com

Open your /etc/sysconfig/network file, locate the HOSTNAME line and change the hostname to your preferred node name.

Adding the FQDN (Hostname)

To ensure your hostname and IP address are routing correctly the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) and IP address should be added to the hosts file. Open the /etc/hosts file:

192.168.0.0 prodnode01.acme.com

With all your files edited and saved, you should reboot so the new name and configuration will be used.

Reboot the system and then use ifconfig or ipaddr to confirm that your new configuration is available. You can also use hostname -f to verify the hostname change,

Original article:

https://www.swiftstack.com/docs/install/configure_networking.html

Change remote desktop port

Port 3389 is the home of the remote desktop protocol that powers Remote Desktop Services on all modern versions of Windows.  If your system has Remote Desktop enabled, it is listening for connections on port 3389.  Since this port is both well known and can be used to attack accounts, it is low hanging fruit for script kiddies and bots looking for an easy target.

Theoretically on a system that does not have an account lockout policy in place, which by the way is not a system default, the RDP protocol can be used to get the administrator password with brute force.  Brute force is a fancy way of saying trying all possible passwords.  If the system never locks out the account then time is the only barrier to eventually getting you password and logging in.

The first defense is to implement a good account lockout policy but that does not solve the entire problem.  Any administrator of a public facing Windows web server will notice that their server is continiously attacked by bots looking for an easy target.  The bots will often lock out your accounts which can be very annoying.

To protect your system from the bots and script kiddies I always reccomend changing the default RDP port.  This will not fool an intelligent attacker but it will weed out the noise.

Follow these steps to change the Remote Desktop server port:

  1. Open up Registry Editor by clicking on the Start Button, type in regedit and then hit Enter.
  2. In Registry Editor, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, SYSTEM, CurrentControlSet, Control, Terminal Server, WinStations and RDP-Tcp.
  3. Right click on the PortNumber dword and select Modify.
  4. Change the base to Decimal and enter a new port between 1025 and 65535 that is not already in use.
  5. Click OK and reboot.

Make sure to reboot to activate the change.

Keep in mind that the next time you want to connect to your system with RDP you will need to provide the port number.  You can do that from the Remote Desktop client by appending a colon after the host name or ip address followed by the port number.  For example, if I have a computer with host name of tweak with RDP running on port 1234 I would use tweak:1234 in the remote desktop client hostname field.

 

original article:

https://tweaks.com/windows/50743/change-remote-desktop-rdp-port/

Firefox profiles

Profiles – Where Firefox stores your bookmarks, passwords and other user data

All of the changes you make in Firefox, like your home page, what toolbars you use, extensions you have installed, saved passwords and your bookmarks, are all stored in a special folder, called a profile. Your profile folder is stored in a separate place from the Firefox program so that, if something ever goes wrong with Firefox, your information will still be there. It also means you can uninstall Firefox without losing your settings and you don’t have to reinstall Firefox to clear your information or troubleshoot a problem.

This information is here for reference. You don’t have to follow these steps unless you were directed to do so from another article.

How do I find my profile?

Click the menu button Fx57menu , click Help and select Troubleshooting Information. The Troubleshooting Information tab will open.

  • Under the Application Basics section, click on Open Folder. Your profile folder will open.
Note: If you are unable to open or use Firefox, follow the instructions in Finding your profile without opening Firefox.

Finding your profile without opening Firefox

Firefox stores your profile folder in this location on your computer, by default:
C:\Users\<your Windows login username>\AppData\Roaming\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\
Windows hides the AppData folder by default but you can find your profile folder as follows:

  1. Press Windows Key +R on the keyboard. A Run dialog will open.
  2. Type in:
    %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\
  3. Click OK. A window will open containing profile folders.
  4. Double-click the profile folder you wish to open. If you only have one profile, its folder would have “default” in the name.
  • Alternatively, you can find your profile by pressing the Windows Key key and then start typing: %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\
Note: To set Windows to show the AppData folder and other hidden files and folders, see Show hidden files – Windows Help.

What information is stored in my profile?

Note: This is not a complete list. Only important information is described.
  • Bookmarks, Downloads and Browsing History: The places.sqlite file contains all your Firefox bookmarks and lists of all the files you’ve downloaded and websites you’ve visited. The bookmarkbackups folder stores bookmark backup files, which can be used to restore your bookmarks. For more information, see Bookmarks in Firefox and Restore bookmarks from backup or move them to another computer.
  • Passwords: Your passwords are stored in the key4.db and logins.json files. For more information, see Password Manager – Remember, delete, change and import saved passwords in Firefox.
  • Site-specific preferences: The permissions.sqlite and content-prefs.sqlite files store many of your Firefox permissions (for instance, which sites are allowed to display popups) or zoom levels that are set on a site-by-site basis (see Font size and zoom – increase the size of web pages).
  • Search engines: The search.json.mozlz4 file stores the user-installed search engines that are available in the Firefox Search bar.
  • Personal dictionary: The persdict.dat file stores any custom words you have added to Firefox’s dictionary. For more information, see How do I use the Firefox spell checker?.
  • Autocomplete history: The formhistory.sqlite file remembers what you have searched for in the Firefox search bar and what information you’ve entered into forms on websites. For more information, see Control whether Firefox automatically fills in forms.
  • Cookies: A cookie is a bit of information stored on your computer by a website you’ve visited. Usually this is something like your site preferences or login status. Cookies are all stored in the cookies.sqlite file.
  • DOM storage: DOM Storage is designed to provide a larger, more secure, and easier-to-use alternative to storing information in cookies. Information is stored in the webappsstore.sqlite file for websites and in the chromeappsstore.sqlite for about:* pages.
  • Extensions: The extensions folder, if it exists, stores files for any extensions you have installed. To learn more about Firefox extensions and other add-ons, see Find and install add-ons to add features to Firefox.
  • Security certificate settings: The cert9.db file stores all your security certificate settings and any SSL certificates you have imported into Firefox.
  • Security device settings: The pkcs11.txt file stores security module configuration.
  • Download actions: The handlers.json file stores your preferences that tell Firefox what to do when it comes across a particular type of file. For example, these are the settings that tell Firefox to open a PDF file with Acrobat Reader when you click on it. For more information, see Change what Firefox does when you click on or download a file.
  • Plugin MIME type: The pluginreg.dat file stores Internet media types related to your installed plugins. For more information, see Use plugins to play audio, video, games and more.
  • Stored session: The sessionstore.jsonlz4 file stores the currently open tabs and windows. For more information, see Restore previous session – Configure when Firefox shows your most recent tabs and windows.
  • Toolbar customization: The xulstore.json file stores toolbar and window size/position settings. For more information, see Customize Firefox controls, buttons and toolbars.
  • User preferences: The prefs.js file stores customized user preference settings, such as changes you make in Firefox Options dialogs. The optional user.js file, if one exists, will override any modified preferences.

Working with profiles

Original article:

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/profiles-where-firefox-stores-user-data

More top sites rows Firefox

It’s a bit hidden, but you can actually change this in the new version:

  1. type “about:config” in the address bar
  2. click the “I accept the risk” button
  3. In the search field at the top, type “browser.newtabpage.activity-stream.topSitesCount”
  4. double-click the item that appears in the list
  5. enter the number 18 and click “OK”.

You can actually have more than three rows if you want as well – entering 24 gives you 4 rows, 30 gives you 5 rows, etc.

 

Original article:

https://support.mozilla.org/nl/questions/1184928

You can’t install Windows on a USB flash drive using Setup

Q: “You can’t install Windows on a USB flash drive using Setup.”

When trying to install Windows 10 from Windows Update the install fails and I get a screen that tells me:

“You can’t install Windows on a USB flash drive using Setup.”

I’m not trying to install it on a USB and i’m just trying to install it onto my computer which runs Windows 8.1 currently.

A:

Had the same problem and found this from google.

The second method is what fixed it for me.

2] The other fix few users reported as being helpful, was to change a registry value. Please be careful while working in the registry. Make sure you create a backup of Registry before you proceed.

  • From the Desktop screen press Win + R
  • Type in Regedit
  • Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control
  • Change the value PortableOperatingSystem to “0” from 1.

Once you change the registry value please reboot the system and try to update again from Windows Store.

Original article:

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-windows_install/you-cant-install-windows-on-a-usb-flash-drive/003a982e-aa32-49ad-8bf5-e7e83d488c63?auth=1

Installing Exchange Server 2016 on Windows Server 2016

On October 1st, Microsoft Exchange Team released the new Exchange Server 2016. Microsoft has been testing and improving on millions of mailboxes in their Office365 environment before releasing the product on-premises. I will describe in this article a step-by-step guide for the installation of Microsoft Exchange Server 2016. The installation considers:

  • a single server deployment of Exchange Server 2016 with the Mailbox role on a new Windows Server 2016
  • Windows Server 2016 forest functional level
  • Exchange Server 2016 with the latest Cumulative Update 4

Because Windows PowerShell is a powerful tool that every sysadmin would know, I will use PowerShell to perform the installation. But If you prefer the graphical interface, you can use it!

Step 1: Requirements

Before installing Exchange Server 2016, you must review the following requirements:

Forest Functional Level for Exchange 2016
  • Windows Server 2008 or higher
Minimum Operation System
  • Windows Server 2012
  • Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Windows Server 2016
Minimum Memory Requirement (RAM)
  • Mailbox Server 8GB minimum
  • Edge Transport Server 4GB minimum

To check your Active Directory Forest Functional Level, you can run the “Get-ADForest” cmdlet:

PowerShell script

Important:

  1. Note that Microsoft doesn’t support the installation of Exchange 2016 on a computer that’s running Windows Server Core or Nano Server. The Windows Server Desktop Experience feature needs to be installed.
  2. Client Access Role is removed in Exchange Server 2016 which simplify the Exchange architecture.

If you need further information about what you need to have in your environment before installing Exchange 2016, please visit the following link: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-US/library/aa996719(v=exchg.160).aspx

Step 2: Installing Pre-Requisites

Open Windows PowerShell as Administrator, and run the sconfig utility to install the latest Windows Updates. Exchange Server 2016 requires the update described in Microsoft Knowledge Base article KB3206632. Without this update, Exchange Server 2016 will not work reliably on Windows Server 2016. Choose the number 6 to download and install Updates:

Open Windows PowerShell as Administrator

Next, run the following command to install the Remote Tools Administration Pack:

PowerShell script

Now, we will install the required roles. The prerequisites for Exchange Server 2016 varies if you run a Windows Server 2012 or 2016. So be careful, and use the following for Windows Server 2016:

Windows indicates that no reboot is required but I advise you to restart the server.

PowerShell script

The .Net Framework 4.5 and higher is required, so to check .Net version on Windows Server 2016:

If it’s above “394747” then it means that you have .NET Framework 4.6.2 or later installed.

PowerShell script

To finish with pre-requisites, you must download and install Unified Communications Managed API 4.0 Runtime: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=34992

Unified Communications Managed API 4.0 Runtime

Click next and finish to install Microsoft UCMA component:

Unified Communications Managed API 4.0 Runtime

Step 3: Preparing Schema and Active Directory

After you’ve prepared a Windows Server with the Exchange Server 2016 pre-requisites you can proceed with the schema update. To apply only the schema update:

First, mount the Exchange Server 2016 installation media, open a PowerShell console and navigate to the setup files. Then type the following command:

Windows PowerShell

Extending schema status must be “Completed”. After applying the schema update we can prepare our Active Directory with the PrepareAD parameter:

Windows PowerShell

The final step to get Active Directory ready for Exchange is to prepare each of the Active Directory domains where Exchange will be installed.

Windows PowerShell

If you have more than one domain, you can replace the PrepareDomain parameter with PrepareAllDomains parameter.

Step 4: Installing the Mailbox Server Role

The Mailbox server role contains all of the components required to run an Exchange Server 2016 server. If you need an Edge Server, you can still install it in Exchange 2016 but that is not a mandatory role. At this step, it’s up to you. To install the Mailbox Role, there are two ways you can do this:

  • Using the graphical interface. Run the exe, choose Next, Accept the agreement, select the Mailbox Role, specify the path for the Exchange Server installation and choose Install.
  • Or you can try to install Exchange with Windows PowerShell.

Below are the available parameters to customize your installation:

In my opinion, it’s never a good idea to install the Exchange Database and the log folder on the root partition.

The setup process will collect some information needed for installation, check the prerequisites and configure your Exchange Server. Just wait …

Windows PowerShell

When it’s done, open Internet Explorer and go to https://<FQDN of Mailbox Server>/owa to validate your Exchange installation.

Exchange installation validation

You have successfully installed your Exchange Server 2016 on Windows Server 2016. The idea of this article was to illustrate how PowerShell can allow us to simplify and automate our daily tasks.

Thanks for reading!

 

Original article:

Installing Exchange Server 2016 on Windows Server 2016

Windows 10 1803 downloaden voor 30 april

Je kunt nu al updaten naar deze versie, met de Media Creation tool via de volgende stappen:

1) download de Media Creation tool:
https://download.microsof…0B1/MediaCreationTool.exe

2) download deze CAB file: https://drive.google.com/…5Q3HaYPaF682SKuWwSHe/view

3) sla de .exe en de .cab in dezelfde folder op.

4) Start de Media Creation tool via de commandline met: MediaCreationTool.exe /selfhost

5) upgrade direct, of bouw eerst een ISO (up to you). En je zit op 17134. :)

 

Original article:

https://tweakers.net/nieuws/137967/windows-10-april-update-verschijnt-maandag-30-april.html

How to Configure NTP Server on Windows Server 2016

 

In this article, I will show you how to configure NTP Server on Windows Server 2016 in just a few steps.

We will use PowerShell to change the NTP Server and we will validate if it worked afterward.

 

Type the following commands

  • w32tm /config /manualpeerlist:pool.ntp.org /syncfromflags:MANUAL
  • Stop-Service w32time
  • Start-Service w32time

Of course, you can take any NTP Server that you want.

Now verify if the time-server was set correctly on your Server 2016 by typing:

  • w32tm /query /status

You should get a reply like this:

Now we will go ahead and verify if our clients sync properly.

 

Verifying if the Time Server was correctly set on our Clients

On a client computer open a PowerShell with right-click and Run as Administrator….

Type:

  • w32tm /query /status

Check the time-server and type:

  • w32tm /resync
  • w32tm /query /status

Then you are able to see that the time-server actually changed like in the example below.

And that’s it! Easy, right?

Always make sure that you use the same time-server in your network and that all your clients are syncing with it. If you have time differences inside of your Active Directory Domain you will run into major issues.

 

Original article:

How to Configure NTP Server on Windows Server 2016